Rescinding scholarships for social media posts



  • https://www.cincinnati.com/story/sports/2020/06/05/little-miami-athletes-scholarship-revoked-after-offensive-social-media-post/3155321001/

    This happened last year at Harvard as well and I suspect it is going to be a lot more widespread. I have a hard time getting behind this sort of thing. Isn't the point to educate kids so they are better citizens rather than to condemn them for the stupid act of an immature mind?

    I can see taking the kid aside for a stern conversation on their views and the views of the university, but not yanking their scholarship.



  • We can't have wrongthink, regardless of age.

    Lock 'em up.



  • Looks like admission was revoked too.

    I would have to hear arguments on both sides.



  • @Loki said in Rescinding scholarships for social media posts:

    Looks like admission was revoked too.

    I would have to hear arguments on both sides.

    Better Call Saul:

    alt text



  • @George-K said in Rescinding scholarships for social media posts:

    @Loki said in Rescinding scholarships for social media posts:

    Looks like admission was revoked too.

    I would have to hear arguments on both sides.

    Better Call Saul:

    alt text

    It would help to know what he actually said.



  • I'm really curious as well but I'm very uncomfortable with the idea in general.





  • @Mik said in Rescinding scholarships for social media posts:

    This happened last year at Harvard as well and I suspect it is going to be a lot more widespread. I have a hard time getting behind this sort of thing. Isn't the point to educate kids so they are better citizens rather than to condemn them for the stupid act of an immature mind?

    I can see taking the kid aside for a stern conversation on their views and the views of the university, but not yanking their scholarship.

    Haven't made up my mind yet ... got a few questions to sort through:

    Are we ready to say the same if the kid's social media post is anti-Semitic in nature?
    What if the posts are unpatriotic/anti-American in nature?
    If the posts are unpatriotic/anti-American in nature, does it make a difference if the school is a military academy?
    What if school is a religious school and the social media post is blasphemous in nature?

    How should the line be drawn between "they kid just needs some education" and "that's sacrilegious, expel the kid"?



  • It’s a good question about whether there should be any limits.

    I need to think more about it too, but my leaning is they need to be very specific with what they don’t allow and have the kid sign it as part of acceptance papers.

    State schools should probably disallow only illegal stuff. Death threats and the like. Maybe a slightly higher bar for scholarships. But maybe not.



  • @jon-nyc said in Rescinding scholarships for social media posts:

    leaning is they need to be very specific with what they don’t allow and have the kid sign it as part of acceptance papers.

    Before or after they've been accepted?

    Is it reasonable to say, "Hey, guess what we just found! Something you said two years ago! You'e disqualified!"?

    (I don't know the timeline of these events, so take my comments in that light.)



  • I think they should make their standards clear on something the kid signs, at application or acceptance, and anything before that is forgiven unless it is blatantly illegal.



  • I'm sorta undecided on crucifixion or just a simple hanging...



  • You can't force a college to accept a kid who said something stupid in high school.

    But after a while that is going to be one weird college.



  • https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/05/us/mls-la-galaxy-aleksandar-katai-wife-instagram-spt-intl/index.html

    L.A. Galaxy part ways with player whose wife made offensive Instagram posts

    (CNN)The Los Angeles Galaxy "mutually agreed to part ways" with midfielder Aleksandar Katai on Friday after the MLS club learned that Katai's wife shared "racist and violent" social media posts.

    Tea Katai posted twice on her Instagram, the first post calling for protesters to be killed, and the second showing a suspected looter holding a shoebox with the caption, "Black Nikes Matter."

    Both posts have since been deleted.

    The Galaxy said the organization stands against racism.

    "Earlier today, the L.A. Galaxy were made aware of a series of racist and violent social media posts ... The L.A. Galaxy strongly condemned the social posts and requested their immediate removal," the team said.

    Aleksandar Katai said on Instagram that his wife's posts were unacceptable.

    "These views are not ones that I share and are not tolerated in my family," he wrote. "This is a mistake from my family and I take full responsibility. I will ensure that my family and I take the necessary actions to learn, understand, listen and support the black community."

    On Friday, the Galaxy released another statement announcing Katai's departure, saying the two sides "mutually agreed to part ways."



  • @Mik am I missing something? What did the kid actually say? That website, like so many news websites these days, it’s so chock-full of ads it’s hard to read. Maybe I missed it.



  • I haven't seen any of the posts in question. But in the long run I don't really care. My original point stands. Should a just turned 18 year old's life be turned upside down and stripped of their achievements due to one stupid internet post? I say no. Too much like thoughtcrime to me and unequally applied. It is fine for black posters to say horrible things about white people as a whole.



  • As Sam Harris has pointed out, we as a society are more ok with accepting murderers who have done their time back into society than we are of accepting a documented wrong-thinker back. That goes doubly for kids who commit crimes. There's no expunging the social media record nor the accountability for it when someone turns 18, and moreover no social will to even try to do so. Meanwhile for actual crimes, we do just that for kids.



  • The other problem is that we only do these things for whatever idea is unfashionable at the time. People hold and post all sorts of unpopular opinions. This one just happens to be up on Wheel of Outrage.



  • @Mik agreed. Not sure about you, but I said plenty of dumb things before I turned 18 (and after), luckily social media wasn’t around to make them immediately public and permanent records.


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